Renegade Roop

mindthefilth:

Poster reads:
"WE DON’T wanna MARRY, WE JUST wanna FUCK (and flame, freak out, flaunt it, fuck up, figure it out, figure it out again, and do something with our lives that isn’t just about property rights and patriarchy, OK?)"
by QACC (Queers Against Capitalist Crap)

mindthefilth:

Poster reads:

"WE DON’T wanna MARRY, WE JUST wanna FUCK (and flame, freak out, flaunt it, fuck up, figure it out, figure it out again, and do something with our lives that isn’t just about property rights and patriarchy, OK?)"

by QACC (Queers Against Capitalist Crap)

(via thepeoplesrecord)

— 32 minutes ago with 3347 notes
truezodiacfact:

I was promised, I would be wise!

truezodiacfact:

I was promised, I would be wise!

(via shit-cats)

— 3 days ago with 118 notes
luisgramps:

Standing at the sky’s edge. En Volcan Xinantecatl (Nevado de Toluca)

luisgramps:

Standing at the sky’s edge. En Volcan Xinantecatl (Nevado de Toluca)

(via fuckyeahmexico)

— 5 days ago with 116 notes
sikhexpo:

"I didn’t ask for it to be over. But then again I didn’t ask for it to begin. For that’s the way it is with life, as some of the most beautiful days come completely by chance. But even the most beautiful days eventually have their sunset." - Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji 📖
🔸🔹🔸🔹🔸🔹 Live in ✨gratitude✨ 😀✌️ 🔹🔸🔹🔸🔹🔸

sikhexpo:

"I didn’t ask for it to be over. But then again I didn’t ask for it to begin. For that’s the way it is with life, as some of the most beautiful days come completely by chance. But even the most beautiful days eventually have their sunset."
- Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji 📖

🔸🔹🔸🔹🔸🔹
Live in ✨gratitude✨ 😀✌️
🔹🔸🔹🔸🔹🔸

— 5 days ago with 5 notes

nprfreshair:

When New York Times columnist Charles Blow was 7 years old, he was sexually abused by his cousin.  The traumatic experience sent him on a path of self-questioning in hopes of understanding how it happened, why it happened, and what it meant. His new memoir, Fire Shut Up in My Bones, is a unwavering account of his abuse and how he healed. 

In the interview Blow discusses the correlation between victims of child sexual abuse and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender identity:

"What the data shows us indisputably is that people who will later identify as LGBT have disproportionate rates of having been victims of child sexual abuse. So there are two ways to think of that — one of which I completely disagree with and one I agree more with.

On the one end, the abuse is making these young people LGBT. The science for that is completely flimsy. I completely disagree with that idea. On the other side … children who will eventually identify as LGBT are more likely to be targets of sexual predators. If you think of it that way, it changes our concept of how we need to nurture and care for children who are different. …

If you look at it that way you realize that in some cases, not all of course, in some cases the predator is targeting children who they already see as kind of having some kind of characteristics that will later be different. And that difference means they’re isolated. That difference means that they are already outside of the social mores, that the predator behavior is now somehow justified because this person is already outside the norm.”

Photo: By Chad Batka, NYT 

(via npr)

— 5 days ago with 1813 notes
deafmuslimpunx:

pretendpagan:

Trans* activists in Mexico City, protesting violence against the LGBTQ community.

damn

deafmuslimpunx:

pretendpagan:

Trans* activists in Mexico City, protesting violence against the LGBTQ community.

damn

(Source: tzintzuntzan, via fuckyeahqueerpeopleofcolor)

— 5 days ago with 90728 notes
غزل

antieverythingism:

Ghazal a poetic expression of both the pain of loss or separation and the beauty of love in spite of that pain.

(via premrasspaaeyaa)

— 6 days ago with 657 notes
18mr:

99-year-old movement legend Grace Lee Boggs is in hospice care, and our thoughts are with her as she completes her life’s journey.

I am coming to the end of a long journey—a journey that began over 70 years ago at the beginning of World War II. This journey has basically been to show that there is an alternative to the Bolshevik revolutionary prototype. It has taken us a long time to accomplish this, but we have been able to do so both as a result of our historical vision and because of the very practical efforts of comrades who have risen to the challenge of creating a revolution unlike any revolution that has been in the past.
Because of my increasing physical limitations in the last few years, I have not been able to play the role that I might have played. But that is not as important now as recognizing what has been achieved. A revolution that is based on the people exercising their creativity in the midst of devastation is one of the great historical contributions of humankind.
We will be finding ways and means to celebrate this, one of which will be the Reimagining Work and Culture conference in October. We want people to understand how much this concept of new work and new culture is based upon not only enormous activity but also on vision and on imagination.
Grace Lee Boggs, Detroit, MI, 9/23/2014

- CM

18mr:

99-year-old movement legend Grace Lee Boggs is in hospice care, and our thoughts are with her as she completes her life’s journey.

I am coming to the end of a long journey—a journey that began over 70 years ago at the beginning of World War II. This journey has basically been to show that there is an alternative to the Bolshevik revolutionary prototype. It has taken us a long time to accomplish this, but we have been able to do so both as a result of our historical vision and because of the very practical efforts of comrades who have risen to the challenge of creating a revolution unlike any revolution that has been in the past.

Because of my increasing physical limitations in the last few years, I have not been able to play the role that I might have played. But that is not as important now as recognizing what has been achieved. A revolution that is based on the people exercising their creativity in the midst of devastation is one of the great historical contributions of humankind.

We will be finding ways and means to celebrate this, one of which will be the Reimagining Work and Culture conference in October. We want people to understand how much this concept of new work and new culture is based upon not only enormous activity but also on vision and on imagination.

Grace Lee Boggs, Detroit, MI, 9/23/2014

- CM

(via angrywocunited)

— 6 days ago with 506 notes

peachmagic:

support bi women in relationships with men. support bi women in relationships with nb ppl. support bi women in relationships with other women. support bi women no matter their partners.

(via angrywocunited)

— 6 days ago with 24474 notes
"

Most of the world’s exploited labor comes from women. Women work in the sweatshops and the giant factories. Women sow and tend and harvest the world’s crops. Women carry and birth and raise children. Women wash and clean and shop and cook. Women care for the sick and the elderly. All of this—layer upon layer of labor—is what makes human society possible. Ripping it off is what makes capitalism possible.

The primacy of women’s labor is normally edited out of political discourse, but it’s a fact beyond dispute. More than half of the world’s women have formal jobs. (In some countries in Asia and Latin America, the percentage is well over 60%.) On top of this, women predominate in millions of illegal and semi-legal “off the books” jobs, where they are normally heavily exploited. Meanwhile, some 70% of women’s labor, worth tens of trillions of dollars a year, is unpaid altogether. Most of the world’s women average 31-42 hours per week on family housework alone. Women “do two-thirds of the world’s work, receive 10% of the world’s income and own 1% of the means of production.”

Throughout history, groups and classes of men have fought over the precious resource of women’s labor. All women, but especially working-class women, who constitute the world’s most valuable source of wealth. Hundreds of millions of these women, the core and majority of the working class, lack any private property or social privilege. They have no ownership, claim or control over the means of production. This sets them apart from the upper stratum of wage workers—labor aristocrats and privileged sectors subsidized from capitalist profits.

Instead, they belong to the “lower and deeper” layers of the working class, compelled to offer their labor up for exploitation within capitalism for sheer survival. This part of the working class stands as capitalism’s main labor force and, historically, its direct antagonist.

Many of these working-class women are paid wages; many are not. Few are paid for all their labor. Most are destitute or economically vulnerable. They labor under extreme duress—facing not only the threat of hunger, but also dependency, slavery and male violence backed up by tradition, family structure and law. Their labor and life experience—and their class position—is often substantially different from that of even the men in their own families.

The multi-sided struggle to own, control and exploit this fantastically profitable labor force is expressed on many levels and in many forms: migrations, wars, genocide, cultural movements, populist rebellions, changes in family structure, colonialism, shifting geopolitical alliances, the rise and fall of governments.

Today, the women at the center of the world working class are experiencing dramatic and fundamental changes in their work lives and their social lives. Capitalism, entering a new phase of development, is remaking the working class. This is where a new revolutionary politics must start.

"
— 6 days ago with 1214 notes

xxxshakespearexxx:


The White Haired Witch of Lunar Kingdom (白发魔女传之明月天国) (pictures without trademark)

http://www.ancientchinese.net/index.php?topic=1141.msg25910#msg25910

(via angrywocunited)

— 6 days ago with 295 notes