Renegade Roop

hippie-galaxy:


mim-akh:

forties-fifties-sixties-love:

1969

the only thing that’s changed since then is the quality of photos

reblogging for comment

hippie-galaxy:

mim-akh:

forties-fifties-sixties-love:

1969

the only thing that’s changed since then is the quality of photos

reblogging for comment

(via guerrillafeminism)

— 4 days ago with 284862 notes
searchingforknowledge:


Fifteen rape victims have formed martial arts movement and are prepared to confront abusers if no one listens to their complaints…


A GROUP of women are fighting back against the sickening culture of rape which they say infects India. Fifteen determined females – all victims themselves – have trained in martial arts and are prepared to hand out rough justice if no one listens to their complaints. And the movement, called the Red Brigade, is growing rapidly following the gang rape and murder of medical student Jyoti Singh Pandey that horrified the world.


In a nation where a woman is reportedly raped every 20 minutes, the group’s leader Usha Vishwakarma said: “We are fighting back – and the boot is now on the other foot.” Member Sufia Hashmi, 17, said: “We’ve caught a lot of men recently. I joined because men always used to pass comments on me and touch my body but now we beat them and they run.”


Like the other members in the northern city of Lucknow, 25- year-old Usha has first-hand experience of the daily dangers women face in the huge nation – a teacher tried to rape her when she was 18. She said: “He grabbed me and tried to open my trousers. I kicked him in the crotch and ran.” Usha complained to staff but they told her to forget it and allowed her attacker to carry on teaching. She said: “Many parents tell girls to quit school so there will be no sexual violence. But we said no – this has to stop. We decided to form a group to fight for ourselves, not just complain.”MORE



Amazing.

searchingforknowledge:

Fifteen rape victims have formed martial arts movement and are prepared to confront abusers if no one listens to their complaints…
A GROUP of women are fighting back against the sickening culture of rape which they say infects India. Fifteen determined females – all victims themselves – have trained in martial arts and are prepared to hand out rough justice if no one listens to their complaints. And the movement, called the Red Brigade, is growing rapidly following the gang rape and murder of medical student Jyoti Singh Pandey that horrified the world.
In a nation where a woman is reportedly raped every 20 minutes, the group’s leader Usha Vishwakarma said: “We are fighting back – and the boot is now on the other foot.” Member Sufia Hashmi, 17, said: “We’ve caught a lot of men recently. I joined because men always used to pass comments on me and touch my body but now we beat them and they run.”
Like the other members in the northern city of Lucknow, 25- year-old Usha has first-hand experience of the daily dangers women face in the huge nation – a teacher tried to rape her when she was 18. She said: “He grabbed me and tried to open my trousers. I kicked him in the crotch and ran.” Usha complained to staff but they told her to forget it and allowed her attacker to carry on teaching. She said: “Many parents tell girls to quit school so there will be no sexual violence. But we said no – this has to stop. We decided to form a group to fight for ourselves, not just complain.”MORE

Amazing.

(Source: talesofthestarshipregeneration, via fuckyeahsouthasia)

— 2 weeks ago with 21740 notes
http://somestrikers.tumblr.com/post/81310901608/an-open-letter-to-uc-grad-students-this-coming →

somestrikers:

AN OPEN LETTER TO UC GRAD STUDENTS—

This coming week, our union—United Auto Workers Local 2865—has called a system-wide strike in protest of unfair labor practices (ULPs) by the university. Although particular grievances differ from campus to campus, in aggregate, they concern the university’s…

FUCK YES.

— 2 weeks ago with 122 notes
"To love. To be loved. To never forget your own insignificance. To never get used to the unspeakable violence and the vulgar disparity of life around you. To seek joy in the saddest places. To pursue beauty to its lair. To never simplify what is complicated or complicate what is simple. To respect strength, never power. Above all, to watch. To try and understand. To never look away. And never, never, to forget."
— 3 weeks ago with 686 notes
threeiiistomyalumni:

tonanzin-x:

Afeni Shakur, black power militant, imprisoned while pregnant facing a  300+ years sentence. Two months after being set free, she gave birth to the future rap legend. 
Afeni Shakur, herself is someone we should all read about.

^^I agree

threeiiistomyalumni:

tonanzin-x:

Afeni Shakur, black power militant, imprisoned while pregnant facing a  300+ years sentence. Two months after being set free, she gave birth to the future rap legend. 

Afeni Shakur, herself is someone we should all read about.

^^I agree

(via anarcho-queer)

— 3 weeks ago with 11351 notes
"The trouble with explaining what queerness is (to your parents, to straight cis people, to your friends, to yourself) is that as soon as you define queerness as this or that, you have lost it. Once you pin queerness down and establish boundaries of what queer is and what it means, whatever that is isn’t queer anymore. It’s a solidified identity, which is precisely what queer isn’t. And so you have to go in search of the queer again. Every time you try to pin it down, it escapes you: that is queerness’ power. I won’t go so far as to say queerness is the search for the queer, but it is perpetually in motion. This makes people uncomfortable. Being queer can feel a bit like sea-sickness sometimes. Some people may even doubt the existence of the queer, given this notion of queer as horizon (as outlined by José Esteban Muñoz). However, I would argue that unlike saying “Queer is…” saying “I am queer” does not limit queerness in a way that eliminates it. Instead, it enacts the notion of queer as horizon: it opens queer up to the infinite possibilities of your future. It understands your present as one of the possibilities of your past future. To say “I am queer” is not to say that queer is only what you are, but that you are an iteration which can and will expand queerness. You are a queerness which has never heretofore occurred, and all your potential is the realm of queer horizon of being. So the academic understanding of queerness does not destroy queer in lived experience. Queer continues to exist in the potentiality of queer-identified bodies. That is what, or where, queer is."
— 3 weeks ago with 525 notes
"I feel unspeakably lonely. And I feel – drained. It is a blank state of mind and soul I cannot describe to you as I think it would not make any difference. Also it is a very private feeling I have – that of melting into a perpetual nervous breakdown. I am often questioning myself what I further want to do, who I further wish to be; which parts of me, exactly, are still functioning properly. No answers, darling. At all."
Anne Sexton, A Self-Portrait In Letters (via petrichour)

(Source: larmoyante, via j----me)

— 3 weeks ago with 7191 notes
fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Maestra: This brief and engaging documentary tells the story of 100,000 Cuban teenagers, most of them girls, who participated in Cuba’s 1961 literacy campaign.
 Historical footage and current-day interviews bring the campaign to life. Most compelling to U.S. students will be the stories of the girls themselves, many of them middle school age, who left their families to take on major responsibilities far away. 
Fifty years later, the brigadistas reminisce about the independence and self-confidence they gained from the great adventure and the trust the country placed in them—in one year, they taught more than 700,000 people to read and write! 
Now available from Women Make Movies: http://bit.ly/1k7v36n 
Photo: Norma and Daysi Guillard, 1961. (Norma Guillard is featured in the film.)
Via Zinn Education Project

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Maestra: This brief and engaging documentary tells the story of 100,000 Cuban teenagers, most of them girls, who participated in Cuba’s 1961 literacy campaign.

Historical footage and current-day interviews bring the campaign to life. Most compelling to U.S. students will be the stories of the girls themselves, many of them middle school age, who left their families to take on major responsibilities far away.

Fifty years later, the brigadistas reminisce about the independence and self-confidence they gained from the great adventure and the trust the country placed in them—in one year, they taught more than 700,000 people to read and write!

Now available from Women Make Movies: http://bit.ly/1k7v36n 

Photo: Norma and Daysi Guillard, 1961. (Norma Guillard is featured in the film.)

Via Zinn Education Project

(via blackwomenworldhistory)

— 1 month ago with 501 notes
Haha, but its actually disturbing.

Haha, but its actually disturbing.

(Source: gurlfeedthefantasy, via shitrichcollegekidssay)

— 1 month ago with 433973 notes

9 Black butch lesbians share their stories in The Butch Mystique (2003)

(Source: gynocraticgrrl, via wocinsolidarity)

— 1 month ago with 23561 notes
"अङ्गणवेदी वसुधा कुल्या जलधिः स्थली च पातालम् ।
वाल्मिकः च सुमेरुः कृतप्रतिज्ञस्य धीरस्य ॥"

For the courageous,

The world is but a tiny ground, 

Its violent rivers, mere canals, 

Its violent netherworlds but a park, 

Its mighty mountains, no more than an ant-hill.

— Sanskrit quote

(via joethought)

(via fuckyeahsouthasia)

— 1 month ago with 142 notes
kaurcaptures:


Kaur Captures


So beautiful!

kaurcaptures:

Kaur Captures

So beautiful!

(via suhaagan)

— 1 month ago with 16 notes