Renegade Roop

clandestsingh:

A TV host asked Mary Lambert, singer of She Keeps Me Warm, how she “dealt with her personal life as a lesbian and as a religious Christian.”

Why are religious views, or lack thereof, seen as something separate from your identity? 

People ask me the same question everyday. Do you know how I reconcile faith with sexuality?

I live as myself, as EVERY aspect of myself. It’s not rocket science.

— 19 hours ago with 9 notes
somelstuff:

Never forget my roots, no matter how far from home I may be. (at Richmond Hill Gurudwara Sahib)

somelstuff:

Never forget my roots, no matter how far from home I may be. (at Richmond Hill Gurudwara Sahib)

— 19 hours ago with 3 notes
mehreenkasana:


The descendants of the last Maharaja of the Sikh Empire, who was forced to hand over the Koh-i-Noor diamond to Queen Victoria, will on Monday launch a court action for his body and possessions to be returned to India
[…]
The jewel is currently mounted in the crown of the Queen Consort, last worn by the late Queen Mother.

The family is also seeking the return of Maharaja Ranjit Singh’s golden throne and for both to be kept at the Golden Temple, the centre of the Sikh faith, in Amrtisar, India.


Their case reopens a controversial chapter in British colonial history that still arouses strong passions in India, particularly in Punjab, where Sikhs regard the exile of Duleep Singh and his “gift” of the Koh-i-Noor diamond to Queen Victoria in 1850 as a national humiliation.
[continued]



"Our property was confiscated by British rule. This letter establishes us as the rightful heirs of Duleep Singh and we want to get back his remains and his other belongings to the Golden Temple," Jaswinder Singh Sandhanwalia told The Daily Telegraph on Sunday.
More power to the Singh family for taking back what belongs to them. Kicking imperialism and colonialism’s collective rear end with Indian might and right.

mehreenkasana:

The descendants of the last Maharaja of the Sikh Empire, who was forced to hand over the Koh-i-Noor diamond to Queen Victoria, will on Monday launch a court action for his body and possessions to be returned to India

[…]

The jewel is currently mounted in the crown of the Queen Consort, last worn by the late Queen Mother.

The family is also seeking the return of Maharaja Ranjit Singh’s golden throne and for both to be kept at the Golden Temple, the centre of the Sikh faith, in Amrtisar, India.

Their case reopens a controversial chapter in British colonial history that still arouses strong passions in India, particularly in Punjab, where Sikhs regard the exile of Duleep Singh and his “gift” of the Koh-i-Noor diamond to Queen Victoria in 1850 as a national humiliation.

[continued]

"Our property was confiscated by British rule. This letter establishes us as the rightful heirs of Duleep Singh and we want to get back his remains and his other belongings to the Golden Temple," Jaswinder Singh Sandhanwalia told The Daily Telegraph on Sunday.

More power to the Singh family for taking back what belongs to them. Kicking imperialism and colonialism’s collective rear end with Indian might and right.

(via cosmicdecember)

— 19 hours ago with 3458 notes

Lupita Nyong’o Photographed by Mikael Jansson, Vogue Magazine July 2014

(Source: howtobeafuckinglady, via fuckyeahethnicwomen)

— 2 days ago with 53444 notes

tsamthepoet:

The world stands with Palestine.

(via suhaagan)

— 2 days ago with 32650 notes
superauricio:

#africana#southafrica#negro#preto#photo#art#brasil#brazil#artgallery#vintage#negra#africadosul#Africa#african #afro

superauricio:

#africana#southafrica#negro#preto#photo#art#brasil#brazil#artgallery#vintage#negra#africadosul#Africa#african #afro

(via turbanista)

— 3 days ago with 110 notes
fotojournalismus:

A pro-Palestinian protester confonts riot police during a demonstration against violence in the Gaza Strip in Paris on July 19, 2014, defying a protest ban. Rallies were also held in more than a dozen other cities, from Lille in the north to Marseille in the South. (Philippe Wojazer/Reuters)

fotojournalismus:

A pro-Palestinian protester confonts riot police during a demonstration against violence in the Gaza Strip in Paris on July 19, 2014, defying a protest ban. Rallies were also held in more than a dozen other cities, from Lille in the north to Marseille in the South. (Philippe Wojazer/Reuters)

— 3 days ago with 425 notes

voltefaccia:

hopeful-melancholy:

Palestinian lady collects gas bombs fired by Israeli army. She grows flowers in these bombs.

❤️❤️

(via cosmicdecember)

— 3 days ago with 210917 notes

dhrupad:

The dances of Pakeezah are of course quite extraordinary and are in tune with the exquisite lyrics. Here Kamal Amrohi deliberately develops a unique style in which rather than the fast chatpata rhythms with a superficial kathak base, he uses a languorous, deliberate and rigourous classical style. As mentioned earlier, the two dances in Gulabi Mahal are unlike many filmi mujra numbers. Meena Kumari makes herself an object of desire by distancing herself from her admirers, presenting herself as a prize difficult to obtain instead of flirting with them seductively as done in many mujra numbers. Even Rekha in her ‘Dil cheez kya hai' in Umrao Jaan is more forward than Meena Kumari in her mujra. 

—Meghnad Desai, Pakeezah

In the songs “Chalte Chalte” and “Thare Rahiyo” which Sahibjaan performs amidst the grandeur of Gulabi Mahal, she frequently isolates herself from her patrons both physically and mentally. Though there are many subtle addresses to them, as the text says, she still places herself at a distance. I think the most expressively different part of these two mujras however, is the way Sahibjaan (and Meena Kumari in her trademark way) claims her space or her stage, despite always being painfully conscious of how societal standards deem her an “impure” woman and thus undeserving of such a privilege. In these songs she tends to spend long scenes facing away from her audience and even leisurely walking around the scenic Gulabi Mahal, further and further away from the patrons. And frequently her thoughts are led to her ongoing infatuation with a stranger which, while melding seamlessly into the themes of the songs, also shift the knowledgeable viewers’ perception of her performance as one of self-contemplation rather than entertainment. This atmosphere and Sahibjaan’s control of performing space is different from many other courtesan dramas” that were popular throughout the 20th century, which usually showed crowded, cramped spaces where the raucous male gaze surrounded and intruded that stage. 

Oh. Yes.

— 4 days ago with 158 notes
My Mom Says the Deepest Stuff... →

kaagazkalam:

Today as I was looking over her shoulder as she cooked, having one of our daily chats, mom began sharing an analogy with me:

"There was a jester and he was brought into a party to entertain guests. The jester overheard people talking about past mistakes, and he saw them getting very depressed. He…

— 4 days ago with 18 notes
culturestrike:

New microsite via Detention Watch Network: Bedtime Stories. As part of the End the Quota Campaign, Detention Watch Network, in partnership with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s (MIT) Codesign Studio, have launched a new microsite featuring “bedtime stories” told by volunteers representing immigrants who have been or are currently detained by the US government as part of the immigration detention bed quota. The website, which features the experiences of people in immigration detention, tracks the nights at home that those currently detained have been deprived and calculates the total cost of the bed quota enforcement over the time that the viewer has been to the website. View the site at this link: EndTheQuota.org/BedtimeStories

culturestrike:

New microsite via Detention Watch Network: Bedtime Stories. As part of the End the Quota Campaign, Detention Watch Network, in partnership with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s (MIT) Codesign Studio, have launched a new microsite featuring “bedtime stories” told by volunteers representing immigrants who have been or are currently detained by the US government as part of the immigration detention bed quota. The website, which features the experiences of people in immigration detention, tracks the nights at home that those currently detained have been deprived and calculates the total cost of the bed quota enforcement over the time that the viewer has been to the website. View the site at this link: EndTheQuota.org/BedtimeStories

— 4 days ago with 3 notes
saltysojourn:

Mayan Women reversing that white settler-colonial gaze.

saltysojourn:

Mayan Women reversing that white settler-colonial gaze.

(via angrywocunited)

— 4 days ago with 2237 notes
pozmagazine:

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Typography, Art and Posters You May Have Missed
Art posted during Gay Pride Weekend, Portland, Maine in late(r)-2000s
(Source: Down Is Not Up)

"Cocktails Are Not A Cure"

pozmagazine:

knowhomo:

LGBTQ* Typography, Art and Posters You May Have Missed

Art posted during Gay Pride Weekend, Portland, Maine in late(r)-2000s

(Source: Down Is Not Up)

"Cocktails Are Not A Cure"

(via anarcho-queer)

— 4 days ago with 3655 notes
afrodiaspores:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

medievalpoc:

the-history-of-fighting:

Dahomey’s Warrior Women

Speaking of West Africa, the Dahomey Warrior Women involves a fascinating history that spans nearly 200 years. It was during this time that the elite squad of female warriors fought and died for the border rights and inter-tribal issues in the ancient kingdom of Dahomey.
These women, who outranked their male counterparts, were given far more privileges, including the ability to  come and go from the palaces as they pleased (unlike the men). They were so revered for their warrior prowess, The Smithsonian explains, that men were taught to keep their distance:
“Recruiting women into the Dahomean army was not especially difficult, despite the requirement to climb thorn hedges and risk life and limb in battle. Most West African women lived lives of forced drudgery. Gezo’s female troops lived in his compound and were kept well supplied with tobacco, alcohol and slaves – as many as 50 to each warrior, according to the noted traveler Sir Richard Burton, who visited Dahomey in the 1860s. And “when amazons walked out of the palace,” notes Alpern, “they were preceded by a slave girl carrying a bell. The sound told every male to get out of their path, retire a certain distance, and look the other way.” To even touch these women meant death.”
Yet as colonialist ambitions grew in the region, the Dahomey female warriors eventually grew sparse. Fierce combat missions to crush the independent kingdom eventually succeeded, and in the 1940s, it is said that the last of the female warriors died.
www.care2.com


I’ve posted about this incredible military force for 1800s Week previously, and you can read more about women warriors of color in this Masterpost. There’s also Amazons of Black Sparta: The Women Warriors of Dahomey by Stanley B. Alpern.

So somebody eplain to me why the hell that book author decided that Greek’s people’s history was needed to legitimate Black people’s lives and accomplishments?! 

Dahomey nation is also one of the places in ancient Africa where homosexuality among the women was documented.
Just adding this cause “there was no homosexuality before the white man came” is a popular lie.

Those interested would be better served by checking out Edna G. Bay’s Wives of the Leopard: Gender, Politics and Culture in the Kingdom of Dahomey (University of Virginia Press, 1998):

Looking at Dahomey against the backdrop of the Atlantic slave trade and the growth of European imperialism, Edna G. Bay reaches for a distinctly Dahomean perspective as she weaves together evidence drawn from travelers’ memoirs and local oral accounts, from the religious practices of vodun, and from ethnographic studies of the twentieth century. Wives of the Leopard thoroughly integrates gender into the political analysis of state systems, effectively creating a social history of power…[T]he book provides an accessible portrait of Dahomey’s complex and fascinating culture without exoticizing it.

A free preview is here.

afrodiaspores:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

medievalpoc:

the-history-of-fighting:

Dahomey’s Warrior Women

Speaking of West Africa, the Dahomey Warrior Women involves a fascinating history that spans nearly 200 years. It was during this time that the elite squad of female warriors fought and died for the border rights and inter-tribal issues in the ancient kingdom of Dahomey.

These women, who outranked their male counterparts, were given far more privileges, including the ability to  come and go from the palaces as they pleased (unlike the men). They were so revered for their warrior prowess, The Smithsonian explains, that men were taught to keep their distance:

“Recruiting women into the Dahomean army was not especially difficult, despite the requirement to climb thorn hedges and risk life and limb in battle. Most West African women lived lives of forced drudgery. Gezo’s female troops lived in his compound and were kept well supplied with tobacco, alcohol and slaves – as many as 50 to each warrior, according to the noted traveler Sir Richard Burton, who visited Dahomey in the 1860s. And “when amazons walked out of the palace,” notes Alpern, “they were preceded by a slave girl carrying a bell. The sound told every male to get out of their path, retire a certain distance, and look the other way.” To even touch these women meant death.”

Yet as colonialist ambitions grew in the region, the Dahomey female warriors eventually grew sparse. Fierce combat missions to crush the independent kingdom eventually succeeded, and in the 1940s, it is said that the last of the female warriors died.

www.care2.com

I’ve posted about this incredible military force for 1800s Week previously, and you can read more about women warriors of color in this Masterpost. There’s also Amazons of Black Sparta: The Women Warriors of Dahomey by Stanley B. Alpern.

So somebody eplain to me why the hell that book author decided that Greek’s people’s history was needed to legitimate Black people’s lives and accomplishments?! 

Dahomey nation is also one of the places in ancient Africa where homosexuality among the women was documented.

Just adding this cause “there was no homosexuality before the white man came” is a popular lie.

Those interested would be better served by checking out Edna G. Bay’s Wives of the Leopard: Gender, Politics and Culture in the Kingdom of Dahomey (University of Virginia Press, 1998):

Looking at Dahomey against the backdrop of the Atlantic slave trade and the growth of European imperialism, Edna G. Bay reaches for a distinctly Dahomean perspective as she weaves together evidence drawn from travelers’ memoirs and local oral accounts, from the religious practices of vodun, and from ethnographic studies of the twentieth century. Wives of the Leopard thoroughly integrates gender into the political analysis of state systems, effectively creating a social history of power…[T]he book provides an accessible portrait of Dahomey’s complex and fascinating culture without exoticizing it.

A free preview is here.

— 4 days ago with 4148 notes